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KIRA FLOOFIE – INFORMED BY FEMINISM

August 25th, 2015 Posted by Uncategorized No Comment yet

For nearly a decade, Kira Floofie has worked with artists and photographers, collaborating with them to fulfill their artistic expression. She has a background in the fine arts and has traveled to nearly every state and to other countries, working with hundreds of creative people.  We caught up with Kira in her home town of Portland, Oregon, during one of her brief respites from touring. You can follow her on Facebook, Twitter, and Instgam.

  1. Kira, you are one of the most successful and sought after art models in America.  You travel constantly.  Can you talk a bit about what you like about your work, what you don’t like, and how you’ve managed to be so successful?

Why thank you for saying so! I have always been passionate about art, and started my modeling career while I was an art student at PSU, so I feel very fortunate to have a career path that has creative value. I feel that my passion for art, along with a naturally responsible, reliable personality are the basis for my success. As soon as I began modeling, I didn’t want to stop, and I put my all into every photoshoot I do. I also feel it is highly important to cultivate industry relationships, as one of my favorite parts of my job is the opportunity to meet and create with my fellow artists. 

I have a love/hate relationship with travel, which is both an exciting and exhausting requirement of freelance modeling. I am very fortunate to be able to travel the world and get paid for it, but it is not glamorous! Since my work takes up more time than not, I don’t always get to see the places I go to, and due to the physically demanding nature of modeling when combined with lots of flying and being exposed to viruses , I often become ill or under the weather. 

 I love the sense of community that comes from working alongside other artists, and the support from my fellow models. I could not do what I do without these people. Carving out my place in this world has been an effort aided by my own sense of responsibility as well as my love for other humans and my desire to create beauty in an often ugly world.

 

  1. Women haven’t always had the freedom you’ve had to shape your own direction. For thousands of years, women have been abused, treated as the property of men, denied education, or any control over their own bodies. It remains that way in too many parts of the world. Gender inequality is still a huge issue. Do you consider yourself a feminist? If so, what does that mean to you, and how has it affected your choices in life?

To quote Bell Hooks, “I advocate feminism.” I minored in Women’s Studies at Portland State, and found feminist empowerment within myself during that period. To me, feminism means EQUALITY for all people in all things. Feminism and human rights are synonymous in my mind, and thus every politically-charged decision I make is rooted in feminist principles. To be clear, something as small as deciding which type of cereal I buy can be a feminist issue: were the grains ethically and sustainably grown and harvested? Am I supporting a corporation who disregards human rights? So, perhaps you can see how almost every decision we make day to day can be informed by feminism.

 

  1. In the vernacular, you are a traveling nude model. That’s a powerful and provocative form of sexual expression. There are places in the world where women are still forced 24/7 to be covered head to toe. Even in the US and other developed nations, there is a small but loud segment of society that is quick to shame women, who push beyond their narrow view of right and wrong. How do you respond to that kind of moral policing?

Yes, women’s rights to self-expression and our rights to police our own bodies are threatened all over the world, and at home. I feel it should be the individual’s right, and due to my chosen career path, I try to set an example for other girls and women. I attempt to make empowering images that will appeal to women as well as men, and show the world that the nude body can be a beautiful, non-threatening, and glorious tool to make art with – not something to be ashamed of. Personally, while I don’t agree with the policing of women’s bodies, I try to respect other cultures’ viewpoints and I don’t feel that force is ever a good means to education. In time, I hope for change across the board.

 

4.There is a faction of feminism that harbors a lot of anger toward men.  They see most media reflections of female sexuality as objectifying and exploitive. How do you respond to that narrow view of feminism?

I find feminism to be constantly evolving, and whichever wave we are on now (4th?) tends to be much more open-minded and all-encompassing. However, there are still those who follow strict feminist doctrines and view almost everything as a threat. To that I say: create new rules! The act of reclaiming previously derogatory words such as “slut,” “bitch,” and “whore” is important, as is the act of reframing women’s sexuality as natural and empowering (and not something that is just for men) in advertising. These things cannot be done without some serious work, and simply shunning them isn’t going to get us anywhere.

 

  1. Is it possible for men to be feminists, and if so, what sets feminist men apart from others who behave as one might expect in a world dominated by men?

Of course it is possible for men to be feminists! My boyfriend is a feminist and I have MANY male feminist friends, whom I adore. We need all the advocates we can get, and as soon as more men realize that feminism is not about hating men, I’m pretty sure they’ll jump on the bandwagon. After all, “feminism is the radical notion that women are people ” – Marie Shear. Male feminists consider the existence of patriarchal systems and consider this in their decisions and daily thinking. That’s the ticket!

 

  1. The old way of defining the word slut is pejorative and dismissive of women who push the traditional, culturally limited envelope of acceptable sexual expression. You have confidently and courageously taken ownership of your body and your life. How important has it been to your happiness and self-esteem to be free to shape your own identity as a young woman?

As a little girl, I could not have imagined traveling the world and working as a nude model! It is so amazing and I revel in the wonder of my life almost daily. However, I have to give myself a little bit of credit – I took this opportunity and have run with it as far as it could take me, regardless of “the rules.” Taking the reins of my own life was the best thing I ever did.

 

  1. In recent years, neuroscience has unlocked many secrets of the brain. For instance, science now tells us our interest in sex is driven directly by the chemistry in our brains. Put simply, we are hard wired to like and want sex. Being sexual is what nature intended. Does that make sense to you?

I’m not sure how to answer this question, other than “yes, of course it makes sense.” Ha!

 

  1. By our definition, a citizen slut is a sex positive person, who feels connected to the Earth, and is compassionate and fully engaged in life. Does that fit with your personal experience, and if so, are you comfortable embracing the label, citizen slut?

I am proud to be a Citizen Slut! I salute my fellow sluts! 

 

 

 

 

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